Macaron vs. Macaroon

Macaron vs. Macaroon

By chocolate expert – and lover of both macarons and macaroons – Valerie Beck, founder of Chocolate Uplift and Chicago Chocolate Tours 

Red Velvet and Chocolate Pumpkin Macarons by Macaron Parlour in New York City
Red Velvet and Chocolate Pumpkin Macarons by Macaron Parlour in New York City (macarons with 1 o)

Macarons have become a popular treat in the US, and perhaps this popularity is at the root of some confusion over what constitutes a macaron with 1 o, versus a macaroon with 2 o’s.

They are indeed 2 different cookies, though both almond-based:

Macaroons (2 o’s) originated in Italy, and are light yet dense cookies covered in coconut and often dipped in chocolate – the best part, right! They’re usually made from egg whites, sugar, and ground almonds.

Chocolate-Dipped Macaroon at the Kendall College student-run cafe
Delicious Chocolate-Dipped Macaroon at the student-run cafe at Kendall College, where I’m a part-time Professor (macaroon, with 2 o’s)

Macarons (1 o), on the other hand, were popularized in France. They are delicate, meringue-based sandwich cookies made from almond flour, and are usually filled with jam, buttercream, or ganache. They are made in many colors and flavors, including chocolate of course.

Sweet and chic: macaron scarf at Laduree NYC
Sweet and chic: macaron scarf at Laduree NYC

Both cookies can be creative and delicious, yet macarons are definitely having a moment. I’ve started a hashtag to differentiate macarons on twitter and instagram: #macaronsnotmacaroons.

Salted Caramel Macaron Ice Cream Sandwich with Chocolate Macarons, at Francois Payard Patisserie in NYC (#macaronsnotmacaroons)
Salted Caramel Macaron Ice Cream Sandwich with Chocolate Macaron, at Francois Payard Patisserie in NYC (#macaronsnotmacaroons)

What a difference an o makes!

Either way, buon appetito, and bon appetit!

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3 thoughts on “Macaron vs. Macaroon

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